Chickens

Unexpected Residents

rescue hensA few weeks ago the garden smallholding gate swung open to welcome two very dehydrated and extremely hungry hens. They were purchased by some morons who thought it would be really funny to use them as part of a prank and then dump them by the side of a road, luckily this was stopped before it happened and they were brought straight here by people close to me.

Both were absolutely riddled with roundworm (passing live adults regularly) and feather lice, they also have scaly leg mite which I’m still treating them for. I don’t know much about their history and I’m guessing wildly when I say they’re around 12 – 15 months old, but I do know that wherever they came from originally they weren’t looked after there either, it seems.

After a spell in quarantine they now occupy one of the coops and will remain here, they’re yet to meet the other girls, but I’m sure that won’t be long now that I’m satisfied with test results from my vet to determine if they’re carrying any contagious poultry diseases.

They’re both incredibly sweet-natured and seem quite at home here.

 

Chickens

Goodbye My Honey

ex battery hen

Yesterday I lost one of my beautiful ex-caged hens. Honey was rescued and spared slaughter last August by a wonderful hen rescue organisation called Little Hen Rescue. She came to our garden smallholding with 2 other rescued hens and spent the rest of her time as free as a bird. She was quite a character, quickly securing position as top hen within the little flock, even trying her best to intimidate my Coral hen housed next to them, through the wire.

ex battery hen

A couple of weeks ago I noticed Honey had problems with her crop emptying properly, I kept an eye on the situation and helped her by massaging the crop contents and administering an oil to lubricate (suitable for poultry), to move the blockage along. This is important to prevent the crop contents from souring, or, becoming completely impacted. Usually this is enough to remedy the problem and for a few days it seemed to be working.

ex battery hen

Honey started to withdraw from the flock again and the crop felt doughy on inspection, I checked her over and discovered a hard lump or mass underneath her which felt a bit like an egg (although she wasn’t displaying any signs of being egg-bound). I took her to see an avian vet to be examined, the hard mass that I felt was her gizzard which was now completely blocked. We agreed to see if we could try to shift the crop and gizzard contents along by giving her Metoclopramide injections, along with a probiotic and medication to prevent sour crop. I was told that it was most likely a tumour rather than infection or any other factor causing the blockage but I wanted to try a bit longer to see if we could turn the situation around. I brought her inside permanently to keep her warm, looked after her and prayed for a miracle.

ex battery hen

Despite my best efforts of nursing Honey, she deteriorated very quickly within a few days. Her crop and gizzard contents had not responded to treatment and she was frightfully thin and very weak. Another appointment to see the vet was made, after seeing and examining her again the mutual decision was made to give her sleep to end any suffering, allowing her to pass away peacefully and humanely.

ex battery hen

I’m comforted by the fact that she escaped the egg industry and a grisly ending, that she free-ranged and felt the sun on her back and grass between her toes. Anyone who gives a home to these girls knows they have unique personalities, you want them to live an unusually long and happy life.

Honey when she first arrived from the egg farm
Honey when she first arrived from the egg farm
chicken orchard
Honey looking much healthier just a few weeks later

Goodbye Honey, thank you for the laughs and cuddles. You were one funny, feisty little hen. Fly free x

To find out more about Little Hen Rescue, forthcoming rescue dates or how to donate to help fund rescue running costs, please visit their website: http://littlehenrescue.co.uk

Chickens

Feathering Up for Winter

ex battery hen

The new rescue hens are growing their new feathers, just in time for the cold winter months. I guess this is a good excuse to reveal how they’re looking now.

ex battery hen

Pumpkin has completed a dramatic make over, growing all her feathers quickly not long after rescue. She’s a tall hen with mid-brown feathers and a white tail, her neck feathers have a white pattern. She was a very nervous hen a few months ago, now she’s confident and relaxed. She’s bottom hen of the trio, I only know that from watching the pecking order being sorted, otherwise you’d never really know. They’re a peaceful little group, unlike my other flock of ‘posh’ hybrids who still insist on inflicting the occasional peck.

ex battery hen

Bramble is taking her time to change into her new clothes, she still looks a bit scruffy. Her new feathers suggest she’ll be a darker brown hen overall and her face and comb have a nice pink colour too (although I’m failing miserably at capturing her face colour in photographs, so you’ll just have to take my word for it).

ex battery hen

I’ve kept many rescue hens over the years and they’re always pale and sickly looking from being kept in the caged farms, ‘colouring up’ after a little TLC. Bramble has been the palest hen I’ve ever seen, her face and comb almost white when she first arrived.

ex battery hen

ex battery hens

Honey’s feathers are a lovely honey-blonde with white patterning over her neck and back. Her new tail feathers haven’t come through yet, so she looks a bit stumpy. She’s a confident hen and very friendly. Every morning she jumps up on top of the hen-house as I lean over to clean it of overnight droppings, placing herself alongside me and straining her neck to see what I’m doing. This little routine always ends up with her jumping down inside the hen-house, straight into the plastic bag stuffed with yucky stuff! Every morning is the same, every morning I giggle at her silly antics.

This looks like a good place to lay an egg
This looks like a good place to lay an egg, much nicer than the cage I used to live in

I recommend keeping some rescue hens for comedy value if nothing else!

Chickens

Blurry August

ex battery hen

Hello blog, it’s been a while.

Last month is still a blur to me, due to family loss. Consequently I haven’t had my blogging hat on, but I did promise to update readers with progress of my new rescue hens and that’s what I’m going to do with this post.

walk in chicken runs

The addition of a new walk-in chicken run thanks to my other half and his DIY skills helped the very traumatised hen overcome her fear of other chickens. With plenty of space (it’s a large enclosure for just 3 chickens) for her to dart out of way should she feel the need to, the choice is hers to approach other chickens in her own way and in her own time, boosting her confidence. She struts around with the other rescue girls now, a very different hen to the one that ran away screaming for her life, cowering down in a corner just a few week ago. She just needed space and time to adapt to her new-found freedom – no longer the punch bag for other caged hens to take their frustration out on.

ex battery hen
‘Pumpkin’ was very traumatised from her time in cages, her rehabilitation had to be handled very carefully for her to gain my trust. Her day-to-day time spent in a cage was mentally damaging to her. Already, given freedom and choices, she’s a different hen and very affectionate towards me.

The pecking order for this little flock has already been sorted out, with ‘top hen’ giving a reminder of her status every so often should the other girls ‘forget’ her authority over them. This is usually done by pulling at the other girls combs, treading them with one stamp of her foot on their back or the ‘stare’ across a food bowl, resulting in the lower ranking hens breaking eye contact immediately and moving elsewhere (sometimes this is enough to warrant respect without any further action needed).

ex battery hen
Top hen ‘Honey’, she’s firm but fair!

ex battery hen

Bedtime always brings drama (even with my flock of ‘posh’ hens housed nearby), the lowest ranking hen (in this case ‘Pumpkin’) is usually last to take her position within the safety of the hen-house at dusk. You could say I study my hens intently, I find chickens and their language absolutely fascinating.

ex battery hen

As you can hopefully see from the photos they’re starting to look healthier.

ex battery hen

If you’d like to offer a home to some hard-working girls please get in touch with your local hen rescue by using this useful website http://exbatteryhens.org.uk. If you would like more information on how to care for rescue hens before committing to rehoming, come along and join the ex battery hens forum community http://exbatteryhens.com. We’re a friendly bunch and happy to answer any questions or concerns you may have from anything to integration, feeding and housing.

Chickens

Rays of Sunshine

rescue hen

I like the title of this post. It describes something positive, something happy and warming. It’s exactly how I felt yesterday, collecting our new rescue hens. Three little girls came home with us to start a new life, they’re a much-needed tonic for me and everything I can possibly give them will be a tonic for them too. I’m pouring every ounce of optimism and energy that I have left (after a very traumatic few weeks) into ‘fixing’ these lovely little hens. They truly are rays of sunshine.

rescue hen

They’re a bit hen-pecked I know, also very tired and extremely pale. One hen in particular is terrified of everything, including other hens, but she’ll come round once she realises she doesn’t have to hide or be afraid for her life anymore. I named her ‘Pumpkin’ because she travelled home on my lap wrapped in an orange blanket. The name just seemed to fit. It will take a little longer for her to adjust than the others (sometimes, as I watch Pumpkin pitifully trying to make herself invisible by crouching low to the floor or trying desperately to find somewhere to hide because another hen joined her at the feeder, I find myself drifting off and thinking about how awful her time in a cage must have really been).

rescue hens

Don’t allow their current appearance to mislead you, as sorry as they look they’re very interested in what this new life with us has to offer, adjusting to the new accommodation, environment, sounds, smells and us humans very quickly, they literally just get on with it and I’m always in awe of this reaction from newly rescued hens.

rescue hen

Just how long these dear little hens have left in this world is unknown, it could be months, it could be years. I don’t care about eggs, it’s not what they’re here for, whatever time they have it will be miles much better than they’ve previously known and hopefully I can put a ray of sunshine back into their lives too.

Quick edit: A little snippet video of Pumpkin, feeling the sunshine

Chickens

Little Hen Rescue – June 15th 2013

ex battery hens

Do you have room in your chicken coop and space in your garden? Can you offer a retirement home to ex-caged laying hens? Yes? Little Hen Rescue would love to hear from you!

Another rescue is scheduled for June 15th with the majority of lucky ladies going to Little Hen Rescue’s base in Norfolk, the rest to Cambridgeshire with collection points in Manea and Haddenham (small amount near Grafham Water).

Reserve your hens today via Little Hen Rescue’s website, choose where you’d like to collect your hens and email the appropriate area (Norfolk or Cambs).

http://www.littlehenrescue.co.uk/Pages/Adoptinghens.aspx

Chickens

My Old Brown Rescue Hen

Old Emily hen
Old Emily hen
This is Emily. Her life as a laying hen started in a barren cage roughly the same size as an A4 piece of paper, caged with many other hens to lay cheap eggs for the consumer and food industry. I rehomed her (along with 5 other hens) via Bedfordshire based hen rescue Free At Last on 20th April 2008. That was 5 years ago.
Emily rotavating soil in the veg garden
Emily rotavating soil in the veg garden
At 15-18 months old, Emily and many hens like her are considered ‘spent’ (meaning she was in her second year of laying and egg production tends to dip slightly), mass production units such as battery farming simply replace spent hens with younger ones. Emily would’ve been sent to slaughter if it wasn’t for the great work of hen rescues up and down the country. Barren cages have since been replaced with enrichment cages (a perch, nesting material and slightly more room) but it’s still a cage at the end of the day.
Emily quickly became part of the family
Emily quickly became part of the family
Emily with her favourite friend
Emily with her favourite friend
Emily blowing a kiss
Emily blowing a kiss
Emily enjoying a dustbath
Emily enjoying a dust bath
Homes are always needed for hens like Emily, if you’re interested in rehoming some ex-caged hens please take a look at Ex Battery Hens – The Hen Rehoming Hub to find your nearest hen rescue. Emily is the last of my original ex battery hens, outliving the many others that I rehomed over the years and that makes her extra special to me. Sadly, she isn’t in the best of health at the moment and I know deep down I have to do the right thing by her and let her go with the help of my superb avian vet. It’s breaking my heart into million pieces, I’m not good with these situations and it never gets any easier. I know she’s had a long life for a hen that was never bred to be a happy garden hen, but I always want more for rescue hens, for me, it’s never long enough.
ex battery hen
Thank you for reading her story and for your interest in rehoming hens just like her.
Chickens

Little Hen Rescue – Homes for Hens

Rescue hens make great pets and are very friendly once they settle in to their new environment.
Rescue hens make great pets and are very friendly

Would you like to re-home some rescue hens? Little Hen Rescue regularly need pet home for rescue hens to live out the rest of their lives. They currently have hens looking for homes that were recently rescued from enrichment cages, most are well feathered and still capable of laying but this can never be guaranteed.

ex battery hens

From my own experiences of keeping rescue hens what I can guarantee is this; any new hen rehomer will quickly adore their new feathery friends and form a close bond, you’ll suddenly wonder where missing hours in your day went until you realise they were spent watching these lovely natured hens finding their feet, visibly enjoying being a real chicken for once in their lives. I cannot stress enough how rewarding it is to witness the changes as they blossom into beautiful garden hens with just a little TLC. It’s certainly one of the best things I’ve ever done.

Gardening together. Rescue hens thrive on a little TLC and fresh air
Gardening together

Collection points from Norfolk, Cambridge and Essex with the main bulk of hens being kept at Little Hen Rescue’s base in Norfolk. If you can offer a home to some deserving hens then please get in touch with Little Hen Rescue by applying via LHR website: http://www.littlehenrescue.co.uk/Pages/Adoptinghens.aspx

 

Other resources:

Ex Battery Hens Forum (you can find me there), a friendly community to chat with other people who keep rescue hens http://www.exbatteryhens.com

Hen Rehoming Hub: Find a hen rescue near you! http://www.exbatteryhens.org.uk/

 

Chickens

A Rare Moment of Sunshine

The sun came out yesterday, just briefly, but long enough to let the new rescue hens out in a run, allowing them to feel the warm sunshine on their skin for the very first time in their lives.

Thanks for all your lovely comments for Willow and Grace!

Chickens

Decisions

I’ve decided to give a home to another pair of rescue hens, recent events spurred me on to make contact with Little Hen Rescue again, to put my name down for their next rescue which is happening on 7th July. This rescue is for hens currently in the new ‘enriched’ cage system, barren battery cages were changed over to the new enriched cage system earlier this year – call them what you like but to me an animal in a cage is still barbaric, scratch pad and a bit of nesting material or not.

The birds are approximately 18 months old and up for slaughter unless homes can be found. I will be bringing home two ladies from the Cambridge collection point on 8th July, it has been a few years since I collected rescue hens and I’m super excited for the life they will have here.

To keep up to date with forthcoming rescues, please take a look at the collection and rescue dates via the Little Hen Rescue website http://www.littlehenrescue.co.uk/Pages/Updatesonrescues.aspx

Collection from Norwich and Cambridge with an occasional collection point in Essex. If you would like to give a home to some deserving hens, email to express your interest and book a time with the co-ordinator via the website here: http://www.littlehenrescue.co.uk/Pages/Adoptinghens.aspx

If you would like to learn more about enriched cages, watch this video filmed inside a farm operating these cages in the UK. I will warn you, it will probably make your heart bleed.

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Little Hen Rescue Appeal for Homes

Little Hen Rescue is a Norfolk based poultry rescue, rescuing and re-homing battery hens, barn hens and other types of poultry including turkeys, geese and ducks. Little Hen Rescue currently have a large number of ex battery hens waiting for good homes, the space is needed to be able to carry out further planned rescues. Could you offer a pet home for some deserving ex battery hens? If you think you can, or you are in need of more information please contact Little Hen Rescue through their website:

http://www.littlehenrescue.co.uk/

Homes are what Little Hen Rescue really need at the moment, there are other ways of helping by spreading the word elsewhere – advertising in your local vets for example would be very helpful. Perhaps you feel you would like to offer a small donation? Donations are always gratefully received by Little Hen Rescue to help cover food, medical and transport costs.  Little Hen Rescue is a non-profit organisation, they exist simply to improve the lives of current UK laying hens. They will from time to time take in other poultry where space allows. 

On behalf of Little Hen Rescue, thank you for reading this appeal.

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Insight into a Battery Farm

Just one row of a battery farm

I know this post is going to shock and appall, but if it makes just one person stop and think twice about buying eggs or produce with eggs from caged hens, then I have achieved what I set out to do. I have permission to use the photos that you see, they were taken by a friend during a real rescue. The farm in question is now closed down for good, but there are many like this one and they are very real. The photo above shows just one row of the farm that held 15,000 battery hens.

A battery hen starts her miserable ‘life’ as a hatchery chick. Thousands of chicks are artificially hatched, no mother hen to nurture and protect. The fluffy cute yellow chicks are sexed, the males go along a moving conveyor, drop off the end and down to their death. They are minced alive. Females take another route on the conveyor. At some point they are de-beaked with a hot blade, slicing the tip of their beaks off. This is a painful and common practise to prevent them causing injuries to each other due to frustration and boredom pecking when in the cages together. Often the de-beaking goes wrong and the chick is left with a deformed beak.

The chicks are reared and then transported to their prison. Hens are crammed into tiny cages at 16 weeks old, normally 5 to 6 hens share a cage but at times as many as 8 or 1o hens have been found squashed together. There is not enough space to turn around, preen or flap their wings.They have no perch, no nesting material, no means to dustbathe or carry out natural instincts. They never see or feel the sun, wind, rain or feel grass between their toes. The cages have wire bottoms that are on a slant so that the eggs roll away onto a conveyor belt, their claws are overgrown and their feet are bruised and painful from standing on wire for over a year. No straw nests for these hens, they never even see the eggs that they lay.

 A battery cage which have been known to hold up to 8 hens

Demonstrating how small the battery cages are

The conveyor belt

When the motor starts up the chains start rattling, the hens go into a frenzy. Yes, its feeding time. Dusty mash is provided as long as the hens can get their necks through the bars of their cage, the weaker hens often get trampled on in the rush to get prime position. Many hens get their beaks caught and maimed in the chain that pulls their food along. Water is provided through a nipple drinker, if a hen is weak or hurt she will go without. These hens survive, they certainly do not have a life. Dead mummified hens have been found in the cages alongside live hens. Some farms use a feed with a hormone additive, this forces the hens to lay twice a day resulting in large swollen bottoms and increasing the risks of hens internal laying from being burnt out. Most battery farms use a  feed with chemicals / colourants added to produce bright orange egg yolks, fooling the consumer into believing the egg is as good visually as a fresh free range egg.

The feed cruel feed chain

Nipple drinkers

After their confinement of approximately 18 months (some longer, depends on the time of year) they are caught by the legs, shackled and killed by having their throats cut or dipped alive into boiling water. You may have eaten a few in your cheap value chicken pie or chicken soup. Some farms deprive hens due for rescue of food, they are not cost-effective to feed if they no longer serve a purpose. The ‘lucky’ hens are rescued and rehomed but a certain number of them cannot be rehomed straight away due to disability, disease or injuries such as broken wings and legs caused by calcium deficiency. Remember, the eggs are important to the farmer, not the hens health. The injured or ‘off their legs’ hens are looked after behind the scenes by the rescues and a handful of dedicated people who foster them till they are healthy enough to be rehomed. Most are crawling with lice and need to be wormed. Although rehoming days are a happy affair, sadly not all of the hens make it but at least they made it out of the cages to die in a dignified way. 

I have a couple of these hens that I describe living here with us, once disabled but now living a happy and normal life, just as a chicken should. Im not trying to offend, im trying to get the message out there that this does go on. We are no longer living on rations in a war-torn country, it does not have to be this way if people refuse to allow it to happen. More and more people are turning to free range, organic free range or better still keeping their own hens in the back garden if this is an option. Buy locally if you can, support the British free range farms, put pressure on Tesco’s to stop selling these barbaric eggs on their shelves. Check food labels for ‘hidden’ battery eggs that are in many foods such as ice cream, cakes, Quiche and even baby food. Ask when eating out if the eggs they use are free range. Food labels should read free range egg, products with ingredients that contain egg yolk powder /egg white powder are normally battery eggs.

Please, be their voice.

If you are able to keep a few laying hens in your garden, please contact one of the following rescues and adopt some ex battery hens:

http://littlehenrescue.co.uk

http://www.bhwt.org.uk

http://www.henrehomers.net

http://free-at-last.org.uk

The best sight of all, an empty farm.

Empty battery farm

Chickens

An Appeal for Little Hen Rescue

Little Hen Rescue have 500 ex battery hens looking for homes. If you have the space and time, please consider giving a few ex battery hens a home this Christmas, it will be one of the most rewarding things you have ever done.

Please go to their web site for more details.
http://littlehenrescue.co.uk/contactus.aspx

Little Hen Rescue are holding another re-homing day this Saturday, contact them for more details.

Chickens

Sunshine Girls

Becki&Hope

Just a few photos of our two new ex-convicts soaking up the sun. Very pleased with Becki’s progress, the limp that she had has almost disappeared, I’m pretty certain that she was stiff from lack of exercise. New fresh feathers are already sprouting and both lay tiny little eggs.

Hope

Becki

What a big hat Becki has!

Becki

Becki

Becki&Hope

Its too soon to join some of the other girls, they need more rest to build up weak limbs and they both could do with gaining more weight. Some of their poops have been a bit iffy so they are being sent to a poultry lab for testing, just to be on the safe side. If anything is lingering then it can be sorted quickly.

I think they are enjoying life at our Battery Hen Haven!

Chickens

More Hens

 

Becki

Well it was bound to happen. Our flock has expanded yet again.

In May I volunteered to help Little Hen Rescue rehome ex battery hens by rehoming hens from our garden. It was a very emotional experience, watching the hens go to their forever homes with keen, kind and very excited folk. It was heart warming to say the least. With the help of a friend and family members, we rehomed 94 hens. Unfortunately there were also a few hens off their legs, basically just too weak to rehome at that point and needed TLC. They were all put safely together on blankets, given food and water and then taken by a friend of ours to be cared for one to one.

After the long exhausting day I was full of mixed emotions. Elated for the hens that were sleeping on straw for the first time in their miserable lives, sad for the hens still enduring the battery farm and missing one of the poorly girls. I just could not get her from my mind, she kept me awake at night thinking about her. Of course, I knew she was being well cared for but my mind kept drifting back to her. I kept in regular contact with their foster mum and was updated on how all the girls were getting on but it was not enough. I had to give her a home here with us and our other nutty ex batts.

Hope

So, now I have 2 new hens. Whoops did I say 2 how did that happen? I have named them Hope and Becki. Hope is the hen that I could not shake and Becki is named after a friend. Hope is walking well and very skittish. Becki is still lame on one leg so she needs a bit more care. They are bonding together nicely and will remain together until they are a little stronger before being introduced to Chrissie, Auntie Marge and Brenda.

They had a lovely day yesterday in the late afternoon sunshine, dust bathing on the lawn and soaking up the warmth into their tired out bodies. Its tear jerking watching an ex battery hen experience these simple pleasures for the first time. Although I have witnessed it many times before, it still gets to me.

Wish them luck.

Chickens

Our New Ex Batts

Ive been so busy lately that I have been neglecting the blog a little, also our readers blogs. So sorry! I shall make some time to get back into the swing of blogging a bit more than I have. I just don’t seem to have enough hours in the day lately.

Anyway, I realise its also been quite some time since I updated the photos of our new ex battery hens that we re-homed in February from Free At Last hen rescue. As some will recall, we lost our dear Shazzy hen and were left with 3 rather scraggy hens. Well, here is how they look now:

Auntie Marge

Brenda

Chrissie

Brenda seems to be doing well since recovering from sour crop which is good news. On a sadder note, Chrissie has gone on to develop EYP. She was a bit of a mess in the egg laying department when she arrived but she did lay. I want to point out that I specifically asked for needy ex batts this time, so these sort of problems I’m afraid come with hens that have been pushed to the limit. I’m not at all sorry that I did, they have brought me much joy which far outweighs the sad times. Chrissie’s EYP is manageable at the moment, I shall keep a close eye on how she copes with it and take it from there. Its all I can do.

I thought I would do a photo comparison that some may find interesting, it also shows why I do what I do! Below is a photo of Auntie Marge on the day of her rescue from a battery farm. Her condition was shocking, as were the other 3 hens we rehomed with her due to spending a longer period of time than usual in the battery farm. This was all down to an increase in egg sales over the Christmas period. I would like to thank those people who contributed to her longer sentence by knowingly buying eggs from caged hens. Not!

Auntie Marge

A few months later this is the same hen, not completely feathered up yet but much healthier and happier.

Auntie Marge

Chickens

Little Hen Rescue Need Homes For 10,000 Battery Hens

Little Hen Rescue desperately need homes for the last remaining battery hens of a farm due to shut down. The slaughter man has been booked by the farmer for 29th June, these hens will be slaughtered unless homes are found ASAP. After spending 18 miserable months of their short lives in a hell hole, never seeing daylight or grass, never knowing what the sun feels like on their backs, they will be held by the legs and roughly put into crates, loaded up like rubbish and killed. All for cheap crappy eggs.

Many co-ordination points have and are being set up to accommodate as wide an area for re homing as possible. If you can give a home to some very needy hens, or can help in other ways ie putting up posters or donating, please contact LHR @ http://www.littlehenrescue.co.uk

If you have been thinking about re homing some ex battery hens but are unsure, please feel free to join the Ex Battery Hens Forum for very friendly and helpful advice  http://www.exbatteryhens.com

If you are a blogger, please pop a post on your blog to help raise awareness.

Please, support LHR and help them to get these hens out.

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Free At Last Hen Rescue – 25th April

Mrs N, one of our ex batts almost a year after rescue

Would you like to re-home some ex battery hens? Free At Last hen rescue based in the Bedfordshire area, need new homes for the next rescue which is scheduled for Saturday 25th April. If you are interested in giving some ex battery hens a new life, please please visit the Free At Last website for more details and contact information.

http://free-at-last.org.uk/

Chickens · Uncategorized

Hen Rescue This Weekend – Homes Urgently Needed

A rescue is happening this weekend on the 24th January, over 2,000 battery hens will be freed from their cages, many with homes already lined up. There may possibly be a joint rescue with another hen rescue, a possible 7,000 hens could very well be free very soon!

If you have room in your life for some chickens please consider ex battery hens. They are so worth it.

If you would like to find out more please visit the following rescues:

http://www.henrehomers.net

http://littlehenrescue.co.uk/default.aspx

http://free-at-last.org.uk/

Chickens

The Good Life

Mrs N

This photo was taken on a warm summers day in August. This is Mrs N, an ex battery chicken who not long ago could only dream of a day spent cooling herself in the dirt, eating grass and insects whilst the sun warmed her feathers. I love this photo, particularly because Mrs N was in such a state when we met her. She has since grown into a confident and happy little hen, just as the other girls have.

I wonder what she was thinking……I wonder if she remembers anything about her battery cage life……hope not.