Wildlife, Wildlife Pond

Wildlife Pond

wildlife pond

I recently blogged about frogs in the koi pond, pleasantly surprised to see several ‘frog couples’ I quickly realised their spawning efforts would be in vain. Forty (or so) Koi most likely enjoyed frog-egg suppers and breakfasts. I did go spawn-spotting but never got the chance to save it.

Koi

The main pond
The main pond
Just a few of our Koi
Just a few of our Koi

A few days after the frog visits we spotted a smooth newt swimming to the rocks (sadly my camera wasn’t to hand), this was very exciting indeed. Pond life activity increased on and in the koi pond during the recent warm weather, water boatmen and pond skaters have arrived too. We decided to help our amphibian visitors successfully reproduce by introducing a small wildlife pond near the main pond, with plenty of mature plants and large rocks to act as hiding places and cover, the elevated position inside the rockery will protect it to a degree from frost.

wildlife pond

wildlife pond

The rockery surrounds the koi pond, the wildlife pond is just inside the rockery in the photo
The rockery surrounds the koi pond, the wildlife pond is just inside the rockery in the photo

The wildlife pond is quite small, just a puddle in comparison to the main pond, but that doesn’t matter. We placed rotting wood logs nearby and planted grasses, foliage and creeping plants such as Ivy around the pond edge. Inside the pond there’s floating oxygenating plants, floating and potted water cress, water forget-me-not, a submerged lily and marsh marigold. Gradually the plants will mature and provide extra cover around the pond edge, the corners have shallow levels to make it easier for wildlife to climb in and out.

wildlife pond

Happy frog in the new wildlife pond
Happy frog in the new wildlife pond

Already a frog is visiting the new pond daily, every evening a pair of sparkling golden eyes blink back at me from the water. We realise it’s probably too late for spawning frogs now, but it’s there, ready and waiting to welcome pond life throughout the year.

15 thoughts on “Wildlife Pond”

  1. This has inspired me to do something similar – I.e. see if we could make a separate wildlife pond at some stage. We have inherited a large (though not as big as yours!) pond in our new garden but it is stuffed full of goldfish (already here when we arrived) who have eaten all the frog spawn, as I feared they might.

  2. Hi Flightly, we wouldn’t chose to put Koi in a pond either. However, they came with the house and garden, and, in fairness to them, we actually enjoy them. They’re ever so friendly and feed from our hands.

  3. Your main pond is very large. Does it take a lot of upkeep? How do you keep it free of blanket weed, which I ‘ve heard is a nuisance every year? Your pictures are wonderful. I so enjoy your posts.

  4. Hi starproms, thank you for your lovely feedback. The pond is quite easy to take care of, but only because the pump and filter system are so good. Blanket weed was a problem during winter (when we moved here), mainly because the fish were hibernating. As soon as the fish were more active they began feeding on it, now it doesn’t have a chance to grow back!

  5. That’s the perfect answer! and I suppose that koi carp eat a lot of blanket weed! We have a koi carp centre near here (in England) and about 2 years ago, it was flooded. A lot of the valuable koi were swept into nearby streams and rivers causing much angst to the owners of the centre. I think most of them were recovered, but there will be some that got away. Mostly here it’s goldfish because most people wouldn’t have space for a large pond. Yours looks so healthy.

  6. I really enjoyed seeing your two ponds, I am considering putting one in but I’m nervous as I have young children. I might try and find a shallow one with a grate to stop them falling in. I think we’d all love watching frogs and other wildlife that it would attract. We have frogs and toads in our garden, so I’m sure they would love it too!

  7. I made a little wildlife pond last year, and we were so thrilled to find a frog using it, and then a few weeks ago masses of frogspawn. Now they are at the tadpole stage, happily swimming around. The children love watching them, and it’s great to have them in our own garden where they can go and watch them whenever they want.

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