Jobs for August

All the hard work is starting to pay off, the vegetable garden is producing plenty to take back to the kitchen. Beans and courgettes will need picking daily; blanche and freeze beans to avoid a glut or waste, try to pick courgettes before they become too big and watery. Not much can be sown now in time for harvest although salad leaves, lettuces and some of the faster growing roots and leaf vegetables should be fine. I like to experiment and push boundaries, I’ll be giving a few other things a try for a late harvest such as carrots, beets, peas and kohl rabi. No harm done if it doesn’t work. As space becomes available, over wintering crops such as kale and purple sprouting broccoli can be planted out.

Some jobs for August:

  • Keep watering tomatoes (especially greenhouse varieties), pinch out side shoots as they appear and growing tips once 4 or 5 trusses have formed. Keep feeding. For ripening tomatoes, tie in main stems to extra canes to support heavy trusses.
  • Cut to the ground all the summer fruiting raspberry canes that have borne fruit, tie in the new green canes for next years fruit.
  • Pick courgette flowers for stuffing or frying
  • Keep sowing salad leaves, radish and lettuces
  • Sow or transplant spring cabbages
  • Plant out the last of kale and purple sprouting broccoli
  • Harvest main crop potatoes, keep earthing up rows to prevent tubers turning green
  • Earth up sweet corn and brassicas to prevent them toppling over
  • Keep cutting sweet pea flowers to bring indoors, remove seed pods to encourage more flowers
  • Ventilate the greenhouse
  • Water regularly
  • Harvest the last of the garlic, allow to dry before stringing
  • Harvest onions if ready, allow to dry before storing
  • Propagate strawberries by gently pushing rooted runners into the soil or small pots of soil. Sever the runner from the adult plant as the runners put on growth and develop a stronger root system.
  • For larger pumpkins, feed once a week with organic tomato feed, in damp weather lift fruits clear of the ground and place onto bricks or plastic trays to prevent rotting.
  • Pinch out the tops of climbing beans to prevent them becoming top-heavy and to encourage new growth lower down
  • Harvest regularly and enjoy!

 

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10 comments

  1. Hmm. Don’t think I am going to get much of an outdoor harvest this year!

    Courgettes – have had 4 from 6 plants. Beans – just starting to be harvested.
    Onions – lifted 26 lbs (wet) when normally the same area produces a dried weight of around 60 lbs. Potatoes – our harvest is down to a third of our normal weights.
    No Pumpkins have formed, no Carrots have grown ( from 5 separate sowings!)

    All the Tayberries rotted on the plants due to rain, as have most of the Plums (or should that be Glums?)

    BUT – we have a lovely growth of Parsnips and Leeks and the Kale is looking good.

    Oh well, next year has to be better!

  2. I have a question:
    I have a potted raspberry on my apartment porch, and the canes that fruited this year are dried, and I had planned to cut them back, but what do you mean by ‘tie in green canes for next season’? I’d like to do everything possible to encourage my little confined plant to refruit next year too.

  3. Denise, summer fruiting raspberries fruit from the previous years growth. While it’s fruiting, the plant sends up new green canes (not woody as the fruiting canes are), these are the canes you need to tie into the support structure (usually posts and wire) for next years fruit. Rasperries are quite rampant, being restricted to a pot your canes may not have the room needed to produce new growth/canes. Hope this helps.

  4. Hi Karen, sounds as if you are enjoying your bounty – my kitchen garden is still at the planning stage, but I hope to get at least one bed established in time to plant out purple sprouting broccoli.

  5. Hi Janet, I’m posting a jobs each month list to be referred to each year, no doubt each year will be slightly different for timings and harvests. Of course, this year has been tough for growing. I haven’t done as well with some things but fantastic with others. Good luck with your new garden!

  6. Hi Compostwoman, it has been a hard year. Hopefully you can look back at this list of jobs for August next year and be on target. I’m posting jobs each month until the end of the year, useful for beginners to refer back to hopefully.

  7. After reading that, I’m looking forward to rotavating my veg patch area, ready in advance of having a veg patch again! We’ve only been here for a few months but I do miss being greenfingered!

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