Fairy Eggs

Fairy Eggs

I found 3 fairy eggs and 1 normal size egg in total during the first 2 weeks of the new rescue hens being here. Fairy eggs are tiny and yolkless eggs and are also known as witch eggs, fart eggs or wind eggs. They’re usually the result of a disturbed reproductive cycle or occur when a hen is coming back into lay after winter. A young pullet may lay a fairy egg just as she begins to lay for the first time but usually these first eggs contain yolk and are just small for a while before gradually increasing in size. As long as the hen appears to be healthy then there’s really nothing to be concerned about.

ex-caged hen

Both hens are growing new feathers now and taking a break from laying, which they thoroughly deserve.

Recycling and Chicken Therapy

feeding chickens

A shed business adjacent to the allotments allows us to take away their scrap wood, they’re happy to let us in the yard at the back to take what we need. Today we rescued some wood from a potential bonfire, which is where the wood ends up if nobody claims it. In the yard there’s a flock of free range hens, they belong to the owners of the shed business. They’re friendly girls and followed me everywhere, I must be a chicken magnet. I enjoyed feeding them little bits of grass, they stayed close and gobbled down earthworms sheltering under planks of wood as we removed it. Clever girls.

feeding chickens

Thanks to the kind folk at the shed business we have plenty of wood to make more raised beds for our allotment, and I enjoyed spending a bit of time with their chickens. It cheered me up a bit, I’ve been feeling low ever since losing Hermione (my Columbine hen) to a heart attack yesterday. She passed away in my arms and it was the most upsetting thing to witness. She appeared healthy prior to yesterday so it was a bit of a shock.

chickens dustbathing

columbine chicken

Goodbye my princess, our garden won’t be the same without you strutting around with your fabulous hair do x

Room in the Chicken Coop

I put my name down for more rescue hens from Little Hen Rescue, the rescue took place over the weekend and I made the short journey to collect them on Sunday.

Sky img_5851MeadowBLOG

I’m gaining their trust very quickly by hand feeding and talking softly, allowing them to come to me in their own way and time. I plan to integrate them carefully with our other two rescue hens soon, once the usual hissy fits have subsided I will update again with new photos.

Goodbye My Honey

ex battery hen

Yesterday I lost one of my beautiful ex-caged hens. Honey was rescued and spared slaughter last August by a wonderful hen rescue organisation called Little Hen Rescue. She came to our garden smallholding with 2 other rescued hens and spent the rest of her time as free as a bird. She was quite a character, quickly securing position as top hen within the little flock, even trying her best to intimidate my Coral hen housed next to them, through the wire.

ex battery hen

A couple of weeks ago I noticed Honey had problems with her crop emptying properly, I kept an eye on the situation and helped her by massaging the crop contents and administering an oil to lubricate (suitable for poultry), to move the blockage along. This is important to prevent the crop contents from souring, or, becoming completely impacted. Usually this is enough to remedy the problem and for a few days it seemed to be working.

ex battery hen

Honey started to withdraw from the flock again and the crop felt doughy on inspection, I checked her over and discovered a hard lump or mass underneath her which felt a bit like an egg (although she wasn’t displaying any signs of being egg-bound). I took her to see an avian vet to be examined, the hard mass that I felt was her gizzard which was now completely blocked. We agreed to see if we could try to shift the crop and gizzard contents along by giving her Metoclopramide injections, along with a probiotic and medication to prevent sour crop. I was told that it was most likely a tumour rather than infection or any other factor causing the blockage but I wanted to try a bit longer to see if we could turn the situation around. I brought her inside permanently to keep her warm, looked after her and prayed for a miracle.

ex battery hen

Despite my best efforts of nursing Honey, she deteriorated very quickly within a few days. Her crop and gizzard contents had not responded to treatment and she was frightfully thin and very weak. Another appointment to see the vet was made, after seeing and examining her again the mutual decision was made to give her sleep to end any suffering, allowing her to pass away peacefully and humanely.

ex battery hen

I’m comforted by the fact that she escaped the egg industry and a grisly ending, that she free-ranged and felt the sun on her back and grass between her toes. Anyone who gives a home to these girls knows they have unique personalities, you want them to live an unusually long and happy life.

Honey when she first arrived from the egg farm

Honey when she first arrived from the egg farm

chicken orchard

Honey looking much healthier just a few weeks later

Goodbye Honey, thank you for the laughs and cuddles. You were one funny, feisty little hen. Fly free x

To find out more about Little Hen Rescue, forthcoming rescue dates or how to donate to help fund rescue running costs, please visit their website: http://littlehenrescue.co.uk

Chicken Colds – Mycoplasma

bubbles in chickens eye mycoplasma

Bubbles can clearly be seen in the corner of the eye, a symptom of mycoplasma respiratory infection in chickens. Note the slight facial swelling. Photo property of The Garden Smallholder Blog, photographer Karen Jackson.

Does my chicken have a cold? Sneezing accompanied by discharge from the nostrils are commonly referred to as a ‘chicken cold’. However, it’s very likely your chicken/flock are suffering from a respiratory infection such as mycoplasma, often severe in winter. A fairly common illness (according to my vet) and contagious, mycoplasma is transmitted by wild birds, footwear, clothing and feeding equipment. The first time chickens succumb to the infection seems to be the worst, subsequent outbreaks seem to be milder. Early symptoms to look out for are bubbles in the eyes (see photo above), sneezing and facial swelling, left untreated this will surely result in rattles in the chest and eventual respiratory distress. Treatment of antibiotics such as Tylan soluble or Denagard prescribed by your veterinary surgeon will help, usually there’s no egg withdrawal but do check with your vet. Individual cases should be quarantined and kept warm, if the whole flock is affected then treat together. As always good hygiene is important to prevent disease or illness with poultry, however new birds brought in can already be carriers, becoming ill soon after arrival due to the stress of being rehoused or integrated within a new flock.

Stress is a trigger.

Sadly some chickens will die. Most affected birds do recover with treatment but will remain carriers (becoming mildly ill again during stressful situations or during winter) some never get ill at all having a higher resistance than others. Avoid overcrowding and keep up strict hygiene, it is important to treat at the first sign of illness. Any chicken can get a respiratory infection such as mycoplasma, even your ‘posh’ ones. ex battery hens

Regular readers of The Garden Smallholder blog will know I give a home to ex-battery hens when space allows, I have done this for many years and it’s a great joy of mine to watch them experience a different quality of life, for however long that may be. There are many people like me but there are just as many who believe that ex-battery hens are sickly creatures that spread diseases. In fact, ex-battery hens are covered by a strict vaccination schedule, they have to be, they’re in the food chain after all. I doubt very much that all hobby breeders vaccinate so strictly. Most of our ex-battery hens have been lost to laying related issues and diseases such as egg yolk peritonitis (EYP), also internal tumours due to faulty genetics caused by thoughtless breeding to create the ultimate laying machines. That’s not to say mycoplasma has never troubled any of the ex battery hens that I’ve kept over the years, it has but always easily treatable.

ex battery hen

I hope this post has been helpful for spotting the early signs of a fairly common respiratory infection in chickens, mycoplasma is not simply a chicken cold and shouldn’t be ignored, it is treatable. I’m not a vet and I don’t claim to be, I’m just putting my little bit of experience out there to help other chicken keepers.

Always seek the advice of a vet (avian or exotics preferably) for signs of illness in poultry.

Feathering Up for Winter

ex battery hen

The new rescue hens are growing their new feathers, just in time for the cold winter months. I guess this is a good excuse to reveal how they’re looking now.

ex battery hen

Pumpkin has completed a dramatic make over, growing all her feathers quickly not long after rescue. She’s a tall hen with mid-brown feathers and a white tail, her neck feathers have a white pattern. She was a very nervous hen a few months ago, now she’s confident and relaxed. She’s bottom hen of the trio, I only know that from watching the pecking order being sorted, otherwise you’d never really know. They’re a peaceful little group, unlike my other flock of ‘posh’ hybrids who still insist on inflicting the occasional peck.

ex battery hen

Bramble is taking her time to change into her new clothes, she still looks a bit scruffy. Her new feathers suggest she’ll be a darker brown hen overall and her face and comb have a nice pink colour too (although I’m failing miserably at capturing her face colour in photographs, so you’ll just have to take my word for it).

ex battery hen

I’ve kept many rescue hens over the years and they’re always pale and sickly looking from being kept in the caged farms, ‘colouring up’ after a little TLC. Bramble has been the palest hen I’ve ever seen, her face and comb almost white when she first arrived.

ex battery hen

ex battery hens

Honey’s feathers are a lovely honey-blonde with white patterning over her neck and back. Her new tail feathers haven’t come through yet, so she looks a bit stumpy. She’s a confident hen and very friendly. Every morning she jumps up on top of the hen-house as I lean over to clean it of overnight droppings, placing herself alongside me and straining her neck to see what I’m doing. This little routine always ends up with her jumping down inside the hen-house, straight into the plastic bag stuffed with yucky stuff! Every morning is the same, every morning I giggle at her silly antics.

This looks like a good place to lay an egg

This looks like a good place to lay an egg, much nicer than the cage I used to live in

I recommend keeping some rescue hens for comedy value if nothing else!

Beet Leaves, Anyone?

speckledy hen

Between the allotment and garden, I seem to have grown rather a lot of beets this year. Because the girls love helping themselves to whatever I’ve grown if they can get to it, I decided to turn a blind eye to them tearing strips off the garden beets.

white chicken

Of course, eating MY veg is much more fun than foraging for stuff growing wild.

speckledy chicken

I think they quite enjoyed picking their own.

Blurry August

ex battery hen

Hello blog, it’s been a while.

Last month is still a blur to me, due to family loss. Consequently I haven’t had my blogging hat on, but I did promise to update readers with progress of my new rescue hens and that’s what I’m going to do with this post.

walk in chicken runs

The addition of a new walk-in chicken run thanks to my other half and his DIY skills helped the very traumatised hen overcome her fear of other chickens. With plenty of space (it’s a large enclosure for just 3 chickens) for her to dart out of way should she feel the need to, the choice is hers to approach other chickens in her own way and in her own time, boosting her confidence. She struts around with the other rescue girls now, a very different hen to the one that ran away screaming for her life, cowering down in a corner just a few week ago. She just needed space and time to adapt to her new-found freedom - no longer the punch bag for other caged hens to take their frustration out on.

ex battery hen

‘Pumpkin’ was very traumatised from her time in cages, her rehabilitation had to be handled very carefully for her to gain my trust. Her day-to-day time spent in a cage was mentally damaging to her. Already, given freedom and choices, she’s a different hen and very affectionate towards me.

The pecking order for this little flock has already been sorted out, with ‘top hen’ giving a reminder of her status every so often should the other girls ‘forget’ her authority over them. This is usually done by pulling at the other girls combs, treading them with one stamp of her foot on their back or the ‘stare’ across a food bowl, resulting in the lower ranking hens breaking eye contact immediately and moving elsewhere (sometimes this is enough to warrant respect without any further action needed).

ex battery hen

Top hen ‘Honey’, she’s firm but fair!

ex battery hen

Bedtime always brings drama (even with my flock of ‘posh’ hens housed nearby), the lowest ranking hen (in this case ‘Pumpkin’) is usually last to take her position within the safety of the hen-house at dusk. You could say I study my hens intently, I find chickens and their language absolutely fascinating.

ex battery hen

As you can hopefully see from the photos they’re starting to look healthier.

ex battery hen

If you’d like to offer a home to some hard-working girls please get in touch with your local hen rescue by using this useful website http://exbatteryhens.org.uk. If you would like more information on how to care for rescue hens before committing to rehoming, come along and join the ex battery hens forum community http://exbatteryhens.com. We’re a friendly bunch and happy to answer any questions or concerns you may have from anything to integration, feeding and housing.

Rays of Sunshine

rescue hen

I like the title of this post. It describes something positive, something happy and warming. It’s exactly how I felt yesterday, collecting our new rescue hens. Three little girls came home with us to start a new life, they’re a much-needed tonic for me and everything I can possibly give them will be a tonic for them too. I’m pouring every ounce of optimism and energy that I have left (after a very traumatic few weeks) into ‘fixing’ these lovely little hens. They truly are rays of sunshine.

rescue hen

They’re a bit hen-pecked I know, also very tired and extremely pale. One hen in particular is terrified of everything, including other hens, but she’ll come round once she realises she doesn’t have to hide or be afraid for her life anymore. I named her ‘Pumpkin’ because she travelled home on my lap wrapped in an orange blanket. The name just seemed to fit. It will take a little longer for her to adjust than the others (sometimes, as I watch Pumpkin pitifully trying to make herself invisible by crouching low to the floor or trying desperately to find somewhere to hide because another hen joined her at the feeder, I find myself drifting off and thinking about how awful her time in a cage must have really been).

rescue hens

Don’t allow their current appearance to mislead you, as sorry as they look they’re very interested in what this new life with us has to offer, adjusting to the new accommodation, environment, sounds, smells and us humans very quickly, they literally just get on with it and I’m always in awe of this reaction from newly rescued hens.

rescue hen

Just how long these dear little hens have left in this world is unknown, it could be months, it could be years. I don’t care about eggs, it’s not what they’re here for, whatever time they have it will be miles much better than they’ve previously known and hopefully I can put a ray of sunshine back into their lives too.

Quick edit: A little snippet video of Pumpkin, feeling the sunshine

The Magic Pink Tray

Our hens cannot resist the lure of the brightly coloured pink tray, often filled with yummy things, it’s an easy way to get the hens back to us quickly should we need to or for getting them back into the hen run safely to lock them in for the night. Beats chasing them around the garden!

I hope you enjoyed the short video I made, if you’d like to subscribe to The Garden Smallholder YouTube channel, visit this link https://www.youtube.com/user/TheGardenSmallholder

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